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20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
thing like that? >> and tv's original bad boy. hollywood reacting this morning to the death of "dallas" star larry hagman. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 a.m. on the west, and here's where we start this morning. larry hagman's family says he was surrounded by family at the end. the 81-year-old actor died of complications from cancer. he's best known for his iconic portrayal of j.r. ewing in the show "dallas." it's a role that he always called his favorite. peter fonda said goodbye to his friend on twitter, saying hagman brought so much fun to everyone's life. cnn entertainment corresponde m correspondent careen winter joins us. i understand that you are at larry hagman's star on the hollywood walk of fame. are people showing up to pay their respects? >> not yet, but you can bet that will change as the morning continues. we are right next to larry hagman's star. still quite early here, so i'm sure there are many people who are waking up just finding out about the sad news. perhaps they're still unaware. that's very popular strip in hollyw
of course as the villain j.r. ewing on his star with dallas. lost his battle with cancer dallas hospital. linda gray had this to say on the star's passing. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. he brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enor muresly. >> she was at his side. >> he he was apparently surrounded by family and friends. >> hagman was the son of mary martin. he was also known for his role as major tony nelson in i dream of jeanne, of course, he was 81 years old. >> he never became hollywood. larry hagman remained dallas. he was from fort worth and he always will stand for dallas. what a legend. love that guy. >> check in with rick reichmuth and see what our weekend first alert forecast looks like. >> looking good. you worry about thanksgiving weekend for travelers getting home and maybe another storm at the end of it we made through the entire thing scot-free. it's cold. 13 degrees in minneapolis. the tenks have dropped off from where you were on wednesday. aside from that, no big storms. cold front eastern seaboard. behind it a ton of sunshine. there will be a
-school in dallas or houston, we want to be able to admit that students. the university of texas is saying we want to consider race sometimes and that is what the dispute is about. the critics say, no, it is wrong to consider race and you don't need to do it in this case. you've got a reasonable amount of racial diversity. host: let's turn to another case -- as you enter that, i will show that had line from "the wall street journal." answer to't know the that question. i think it would be unlikely, however. justice scalia is 76 and justice kennedy is 76. they are both generally on the right side of the court. justice ruth better ginsburg will be 80 in the spring. she is the oldest of the justices on the liberal side. if you had to guess who was going to leave in the next four years, i think the standard guess would be justice ginsburg. it was very important for the ideological makeup of the court whether barack obama or mitt romney is president of united states because it justice ginsburg had left and another conservative justice came in, that could have changed the balance of the court. if, in th
remember absolutely nothing. she'd been looking at christmas lights from the air north of dallas last year, when she got out of her friend's plane and inexplicably walked to the front of it. days after the accident, her mother told "gma" about that harrowing night. >> i was there to hold her. and it's the toughest part of it all. just seeing her laying there. and waiting for the help. >> reporter: she lost her left eye and part of her left arm. her memoir due out next week, is entitled "still lolo." that's her nickname. lauren focuses on her recovery, the awkward fitting and painting of her left eye. her self-consciousness of her prosthetic left arm. she writes, i don't know why this is so hard, i said. soldiers are dying in afghanistan right now. and i'm too chicken to do this one thing. the former model believes her encounter with that propeller blade may have made her a better person. she writes, i came to see how there was so much more to my life than being worried about how i looked. for "good morning america," ryan owens, abc news, dallas. >> what a great perspective. >>> speaking ab
swing. suburbs of dallas, houston, san netanya, atlanta, charlotte, and south carolina ever -- were republican. analyzing by saying suburbs does not work. you have to look at each individual suburb or the region of the country. and we have to rethink the way we spend money in politics. if this was a $6 billion election-year with status quo results, the biggest success would -- when it comes to money and politics and i'm not talking about message should dismiss des -- macro, it may be an effective way to pay voters directly. should dismiss demographics -- independence because they leaned democratic. the suburbs cannot be analyzed as a whole. you look nationally, romney won the suburbs by two points. look at northern virginia. it delivered -- the blue state suburbs, philadelphia whiteout romney. the suburbs also wiped out romney. new york, philadelphia, d.c., los angeles, san francisco, the suburbs were democratic. the suburbs were swing. suburbs of dallas, houston, san netanya, atlanta, charlotte, and south carolina ever -- were republican. analyzing by saying suburbs does not work.
states, atlanta, dallas, los angeles -- who is doing that reporting here? so much attention is focused on what is happening in mexico, we are lamenting the strengths or weaknesses of reporting in mexico. the mexican reporters, especially the regional ones, were hardest hit. it is the once in these regional outlets like tijuana. they want to know who was telling the other side of the story and who is doing the money reporting, all these narco dollars. who is doing the story about money laundering? i do not know if i answered your question, but that is certainly a kind of push back there. who is telling the good story and -- big story and the small story? >> let me bring in carrie lozano to the conversation. she is a documentary filmmaker and journalist who has done a lot of work. her from "underground" appeared at sundance. also, she is an emerging expert on the question of collaborative reporting, journalists, between news organizations, citizens, she works in the investigative reporting for uc berkley and has co-founded the collaboration central. very basic question -- who is doing th
: this is the first allegation i have heard of that. host: but go to dallas, texas, independent line. caller: is there a historical comparison to suppression. third-party votes as there is today? guest: i do not know what you mean about a suppression of the third-party voices. there have been the third party boys over there. for example, the debates, back when they were run by the league of women voters and now the league -- the debate commission. ross perot felt when he did not meet a certain threshold in the polls that he was not invited into the debates. there are any number of complaints that have been made over the years. it is tough for third-party to get on the ballot. let's be honest. the two major parties are aggressive in perpetuating themselves and they are not interested in fostering strong challengers. host: the history of money in campaigning. guest: it is a perennial issue. i hate to say that it is evergreen, but iwaith us. going back to 1996, that was an interesting election. -- 1896, he was very much the candidate of industry, business. william jennings bryan, a populist fro
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)